Double Your Pleasure – Pick the Final Rows of Peach Season AND a Bangin’ Croppa Honeycrisp Apples! Also Pick Gala, McIntosh, Jonamac; Secret Tomato Deal; Secret Cidery Dinner; Fresh Weekend Donuts.

ESTEEMED FARMKETEERS:  Have you ever said this to yourself?  “Wow, I’m amazing.”  If you have said it, three cheers for you.  You probably really are amazing.  If you have not said it, don’t worry.  Let us help.  It’s pretty easy.

All you have to do is:  Turn left when you see these arrows by the pear trees.  If you turn left, you will have achieved all that is asked of you at that moment in your life.  And that IS amazing.  Go ahead and say, “Wow, I’m amazing.”  You would be amazed by how many people turn right –or– drive straight when they come to this farmy intersection.  (For the record, nobody has “turned straight” or “gone straight” here, as far as we know, but that would be fine too.  The pears are experts at minding their own business.  They would never think of telling you how to live your one wild and precious life.)

“But I couldn’t find the pear trees…!”  Good point, by the time this Fresh Crop Alert hits newsstands, the Bartlett pears will be scarcer than deviled eggs after a church picnic.  Same for the Asian pears.  Thank you for being such radically fervent parishioners.  Pear-ishioners.  Truth is, by the time this Fresh Crop Alert hits newsstands, the red arrow signs might be gone too – sneakily moved to another part of the orchard and FLIPPED OVER to point right and stuck, absurdly, to an AMPERSAND.  This state of affairs is called ‘entropy’ and our signage team has received commendations for excellence in that most esoteric discipline.  Meanwhile more exotic pears are ripening and you can find them at the farm stand.

Pick your own peaches – or load up at the stand.  This is the last major weekend of peach season.  The final 2 rows are open for picking.  If doing the labor of picking peaches yourself sounds too… laborious… and also makes you ask yourself, Why I am paying these people when I am doing the labor myself? – don’t be ashamed, you are not alone.  Perhaps one thousand pickers before you have carried that ponderous notion around the orchard and departed with a bag full of fruit and head full of additional questions they picked up along the way.  You should expect to leave the farm with at least one unanswered – even unanswerable – question for every pound of produce you buy.  To make the u-pick equation even weirder, you can buy peaches at the stand in various configurations, some of which end up at a better price per pound than u-pick (while supplies last).  Thus trying to leave The ‘Creek in a state of mental clarity is like slinging a hammock between two cornstalks.

Pick your own apples – HONEYCRISP and others!  Did somebody say HONEYCRISPPPP?!  Well does a cat have climbing gear?  Yes.  Yes it does.  And today is the official start of Honeycrisp season.  Some of you started last week but now is your chance to conform and be like the rest of us.  No crop motivates pickers like Honeycrisp and we expect the orchard to be livelier than a flock of two-tailed puppies on Coke Zero and catnip.  Also in the Dwarf Orchard you can find Gala, Jonamac, and Autumn Crisp.  Autumn Crisp used to be called “NYS 674” but somebody thought a rebrand would sell more apples.  Can a name influence your perception of taste?  Think of chocolate mousse versus chocolate mouse, like in the cinematic classic Rosemary’s Baby.  An altogether creepy gig once you factor in Roman Polanski, Mia Farrow (with eery Frank Sinatra sending her divorce papers while she was on set), and the occult-obsessed neighbors canoodling in the closet.  Not to mention “tannis root,” which we do NOT grow at The ‘Creek.  But we digress.  You can also pick McIntosh – a classic of its own – in the Vintage Orchard.

High time to load up on tomatoes and peppers – sweet and hot.  There are a few dozen varieties of tomatoes and peppers and you simply have to come out and rummage around under the leaves to see what’s in abundance.  It’s too hard to tell you here, or in response to Facebook and Instagram questions, exactly what kinds you will find when you come.  Eggplants, meanwhile, are mostly small and scattered since your collective appetite for them has been voracious since first mention a couple months ago.  Anyway, don’t delay, it’s time.

Super secret tomato sale – prepicked pecks of Beefsteak ($18) and Romas ($15).  These would normally be about $25 by the pound.  The sale is so sudden and so super-secret because it might only last one day… or LESS.  Kelsey here at the farm stand said we have about 5 or 10 pecks of each that must be sauced NOW, so first come, first get.  This Fresh Crop Alert might reach 10,000 people in the first few hours, and there are only a few pecks.  So ask as soon as you get here, and if they are gone, please be nice to the stand worker.  Try your hand at picking and hopefully find some beauties in the field.

Fresh cider & cider donuts.  Everyone is back to school and this topic is going to take some explaining.  Okay here we go.  There is fresh cider in our donuts, but if you want cider, you don’t have to squeeze it out of the donuts.  You can just buy a half-gallon or one-gallon jug.  That’s Part One of the lesson.  Part Two:  A baker’s dozen is 13, a farmer’s dozen is 14, but Nick the Donut Kid isn’t really a baker or farmer so he’s serving 12 donuts per dozen like a dozen is supposed to be.  Just like Grandma said.  Sometimes it takes a thoughtful teenager to bring things back to the Old Ways.  If you find that your bag of donuts has one or two extra in the bottom, please count that as dumb luck and don’t get uppity and start thinking you deserve that bonus every time.  Bonus donuts aren’t a right or a privilege – they’re a mistake.  Our free advice is don’t get all high and mighty; because remember, the higher a monkey climbs the more he shows his BUTT.  You can get your freshly fried toroids of fructotic splendor by the dozen or half-dozen between 10:30 and 6:00 on Saturday and Sunday.  If you want cinnamon sugar, just whisper, “A sprinkle of SIN, SUGAR.”

You are invited Thursday, October 3, at 6:00 PM – Dinner Party with the Cider Makers of Eve’s Cidery, Chef Brad Marshall from The Piggery, and Special Guest, Author Jason Wilson.  Get info and tickets now!   You have probably heard about the nationally acclaimed cidery just south of Ithaca, Eve’s Cidery – often credited with stimulating the artisan cider revival here in the Finger Lakes.  They are our old friends and indeed many of the trees in their orchard come from our nursery here at The ‘Creek.  Eve’s Cidery features large in the new book The Cider Revival by leading food and wine writer Jason Wilson.  Please see the menu and sign up for this special six-course farm-to-table cider dinner hosted at Eve’s Cidery in Van Etten.  Your ticket includes dinner, drinks, and a signed copy of Jason’s new book that covers so many familiar businesses in our burgeoning regional cider scene.  See you there?

Want to know what’s prettier than a pat of butter melting on a short stackA fresh-fired, farm-to-table pizza with peaches from The ‘Creek.  Whoa @stonebendfarm.

A special guest in the flower patch.  Say hello to Magnolia Pie Adventure Dog, @magnolia.pie_adventure.dog.

Thank you… for being cherubic and helpy Farmketeers.

Love to y’all.  Hope to see you at The ‘Creek.

Posted in Crop Alerts & Farm Buzz | Leave a comment

Big Timeeeee Peach Timeeeee: Come Pick Your Own Peaches & Tomatoes & Apples; Pick Bartlett Pears & Asian Pears; Get Sweet Cider Daily; Eat Li’l Donuts on Weekends; Free Playground.

DEAR FARMKETEERS:  You’ve often heard us say, “Even a broken clock is right twice a day.”  But what do you call a clock that tocks 3 different times at once?  That’s the ‘Creek Clock.  Yes, our jankety old farm chronometer is currently bonging out 3 readings:  Peach O’Clock!  Tomato Time!  Apple Hour!  All this minute.  All with some urgency.

It is GO time for locavores.  In a single ramble round the farm, you can pick juicy peaches, bursting tomatoes, crisp apples, and – a last-minute addition to this Fresh Crop Alert – sweet pears, both Bartlett and Asian pears!  That’s a bona fide cacophony of bells bonging on the ‘Creek Clock.

Bing bongggg – Peaches!  Good morning, sleepyhead!  Don’t hit “snooze” on this breaking news.  Peach picking season is peaking now, about 4 to 7 days later than a typical year, so you can have chin-drizzling bites of summer in September.  You deserve every one.  But this beautiful and abundant crop will go poof soon.  Every bonggg is followed by a pooffff.

Bing bonggg – Tomatoes!  You can pick about 20 kinds of tomatoes.  The abundance of each variety ebbs and flows with crowds and weather.  You should find plenty of romas and beefsteaks and cherries and heirlooms.  Hard to send a precise report; you have to come explore, maybe try new kinds that you find in the field.  Time to “put up” tomatoes for the off-season.

Bingggg bonngg – Apples!  The 2019 apple picking season is already off to a brisk start – you apple fanatics have torn through each of the early varieties.  Picked them clean.  Now picking:  Honeycrisp (shhhh… secret!), Elstar, Dayton, and oddballs.  Probably a couple additional varieties by the time you get here.  We have over 75 kinds in the Dwarf Orchard, some familiar, some new to you.  Don’t just pick H—-crisp.  Explore!

Bartlett Pears and Asian Pears!  Start with Bartletts on the old trees by the main road.  Ask at the stand for a map.  These are delicious classics for eating fresh.  You can give them a day in a paper bag on the kitchen counter to reach perfect sweetness.  Try them poached with a balsamic drizzle?  Then hike up to the Asian pears in the back orchard.  If you’ve never had an Asian pear, do this now.  You will almost certainly become a devotee – and they will get picked fast.  They are round like apples, green like pears, and a delight at first bite.

Donuts Saturday & Sunday.  Get your freshly fried toroids of fructotic splendor by the dozen or half-dozen.  The Mark II Donut Robot runs from 10:30 (loosely) to 6:00 (sharp).  Nick the Donut Kid runs a tight robot.  Good luck getting a donut at 10:29 or 6:01.  Remember, if you want cinnamon sugar, just whisper, “A sprinkle of SIN, SUGAR.”

Apple cider – also known as “Orchard Ambrosia.”  Pressed fresh every week and available in jugs every day.  It is 100% unpasteurized fruit juice like the old days.  Freezes great, just let a little out before you put it in cold storage.  The blend gains character and depth with each passing week because new apples come into the mix.

Veggies – sweet peppers, hot peppers, eggplants, and the aforementioned tomatoes.   Come get yours.  Forage in the Nightshade fields for dozens of varieties.  Don’t rub your eyes after picking hot peppers.  Watch out for prickles on the eggplant stems.  Don’t step on squishy fallen tomatoes.

Flowers – bouquets and buckets.  Pick your own $5 bouquets of zinnias, snapdragons, verbena, gomphrena, celosia, cornflower, statice, strawflower, scabiosa, sweetpeas, salvia, aster, dianthus, algeratum, and others.  Need a bucketful?  Bring a 5-gallon device and pick it full for only $35.  Also shop at the stand for beautiful bouquets in mason jars, handcut and arranged by ‘Creekniks.

Thank you… for being convivial and genuine Farmketeers.

Love to y’all.  Hope to see you at The ‘Creek.

Posted in Crop Alerts & Farm Buzz

High Time to Pick Your Peaches, First Pears, Four Kinds of Apples, and Buckets of Flowers; Also Pick Tomatoes, Peppers, Eggplants; Cider Getting Gooder; Weekend Donutsssss.

DEAR FARMKETEERS:  For pagans and astronomers, summer begins on the solstice, June 21.  But for us Finger Lakes fruit farmers, summer begins when the mystical triad of tree orbs comes into transcendental alignment – when peaches, pears, and apples are all ready for plucking at the same time.  When, indeed, we collectively stumble from Peachtown to Appleville… across Bartlett Bridge.

Happy first day of summer.  Just in time for Labor Day.  Yes, peach season is powering into its peak week, and apple season threatens with all its autumnal glee and gloom.  Meantime, a humble little pear crop has appeared to help us make the transition.  You can pick Bartletts now.

Won’t you cross over with us?  Climb into your u-pick buggy with friends and family.  Cue your favorite road trip sing-a-longs.  John Denver and all that.  Peaches, pears, and apples are all picking.  Come help us pick the summer orchards clean.  That will clear the road to a bumper apple season ahead.

Peaches!  Pick lots now!  This is the moment.  Tons ripened this week.  Do not wait.  They’ll be here and gone.  Remember – Donut peaches already got hosed in a flash by fanatical hordes.  Now you can pick big, round, juicy yellow-fleshed and white-fleshed peaches.  It’s go time.

How to avoid heartbreaking waste in peach season:  Don’t squeeze peaches on the tree.  Exhibit A is a cold, hard thumbprint.  Straight up peach abuse.  Somebody was testing ripeness.  They found out it was ripe.  They left it on the tree.  It takes an experienced eye to judge ripeness in a peach by looking.  Best thing to do is:  Ask us which rows are ready.  Pick those peaches.  Take them home even if they feel a little firm.  In 2 days you’ll have a perfect peach.  Stick them in a brown bag to expedite.  Up to you whether you squeeze a peach after it’s yours.  We won’t be judgy.

Pears!  Start with Bartletts on the old trees by the main road.  Ask at the stand for a map.  These are delicious classics for eating fresh – but you might give them a day in a brown bag on the kitchen counter, since pears ripen from the inside out.  Try them poached with a balsamic drizzle, a first date flavorite.

Apples!  Pick your own Zestars (pictured), Ginger Golds, Akanes, and St. Edmund’s Russets.  All tasty early apples.  More varieties ripening every week.

How to avoid heartbreaking waste in apple season:  Pick with 2 hands, steadying the branch and/or nearby apples with your non-dominant hand, then twist off your target apple with your best paw.  Don’t let an apple fall, then knock another apple below, causing a chain reaction.  Multiply that effect by thousands of pickers… and you got a defeated apple farmer.  Please read our Farm School tutorial, How to Pick an Apple.

Bouquets and buckets.  Pick your own $5 bouquets of zinnias, snapdragons, verbena, gomphrena, celosia, cornflower, statice, strawflower, scabiosa, sweetpeas, salvia, aster, dianthus, and algeratum.  Need a bucketful?  Bring a 5-gallon jobber and pick it full for only $35.  Also shop at the stand for beautiful bouquets in mason jars, handcut and arranged by ‘Creekniks.

Tomatoes, Eggplants, Sweet Peppers, Hot Peppers.   There are many varieties in the field, and the abundance of each varies with the days and the crowds.  You simply have to hunt around when you get here.  It’s hard to give a detailed report when that might go out of date within a day.  Come pick, you’ll find something savory.  Don’t rub your eyes after picking hot peppers.  Duh, right?  But just saying.

“Orchard Ambrosia” Pressed fresh every week, 100% tree fruit, unpasteurized like the old days.  Get your gallon and half-gallon jugs.  The blend gets better with each passing week as new apples ripen.  Freezes great.  One family down the street makes ice cubes with it.  Another turns it into moonshine.  And still another turns it into donuts.  Oh, wait, that’s us.

Donuts Saturday & Sunday 10:30 to 6:00.  Get your freshly fried toroids of fructotic splendor by the dozen or half-dozen.  The Mark II Donut Robot runs from 10:30 (roughly) to 6:00 (sharp).  Nick the Donut Kid runs a tight robot.  Good luck getting a donut at 10:29 or 6:01.  If you want cinnamon sugar, just whisper to him, “A sprinkle of SIN, SUGAR.”

Speaking of Peachtown, we share this image of a road sign from nearby Cayuga County.  Something to reflect upon… Chonodote.

Thank you for being reflective and mindful Farmketeers.

Love to y’all.  Hope to see you at The ‘Creek.

Posted in Crop Alerts & Farm Buzz

Sound the Horn, er, Hen of Plenty! Pick Your Own Apples, Peaches, Vegetables, and Flowers; Come to Saturday Class on Medicinal & Traditional Uses of Peaches; Get Sweet Cider & Fresh Donuts.

DEAR FARMKETEERS:  Uni means “one,” and corn means “horn.”  Thus unicorn means “one horn.”

Meanwhile copia means “plenty,” as in copious.  So cornucopia means “horn of plenty,” from the Classical Latin.  But words slip and slide over the eons.  Nowadays, in Modern Latin – the language of the agricultural classes – the meaning of corn has shifted ever so slightly from “horn” to “hen.”

And what’s THAT we hear?!  Is it the Hen of Plenty?!  Why yes it is!  Sounding in the hills above Ithaca!  Archie is smashing the keys in a bombastic rendition of the official theme song of Indian Creek Farm, trumpeting the dawn of picking season proper and an abundant local harvest.  (Imagine a jazz band braying on their horns of plenty.  Fruit flying higgledy-piggledy and ‘Creekniks dancing like peaches kasplonkered on apple wine.)

Yes, Farm Fans, it’s THAT time.  The one day every year when we let the barnyard beasts host an open mic on the family heirloom instruments.  This year it coincides with the announcement that SANSA apples are ready to pick.  Sweet and acidic Sansas, lovely red Sansas, the first “real” apples of the year for many people.  Sansa is a 1970s cross bewteen Akane and Gala, inheriting the sweetness of an early Gala along with bright acid befitting the late August ripening date.  Come pick now in Row 10 of the Dwarf Orchard.

How to avoid heartbreaking waste in apple season:  Pick with 2 hands, steadying the branch and/or nearby apples with your non-dominant hand, then twist off your target apple with your best paw.  Don’t let an apple fall, then knock another apple below, causing a chain reaction.  Multiply that effect by thousands of pickers… and you got a defeated apple farmer.  Please read our Farm School tutorial, How to Pick an Apple.

Peaches are picking.  We enter week 3 of peach season with a good crop to be picked – and much more to ripen NEXT week.  However, fans of “donut” peaches will be shocked and dismayed:  The donut peaches will be picked clean by the weekend.  What?!  Sorry, you heard right.  Although we hadn’t opened the donuts for picking – indeed we had many of the donut trees ribboned off – they got picked well ahead of schedule by rogue fanatics of these fat little frisbee fruits.

How to avoid heartbreaking waste in peach season:  Don’t squeeze peaches on the tree.  Exhibit A is a cold, hard thumbprint.  Straight up peach abuse.  Somebody was testing ripeness.  They found out it was ripe.  They left it on the tree.  It takes an experienced eye to judge ripeness in a peach by looking.  Best thing to do is:  Ask us which rows are ready.  Pick those peaches.  Take them home even if they feel a little firm.  In 2 days you’ll have a perfect peach.  Stick them in a brown bag to expedite.  Up to you whether you squeeze a peach after it’s yours.  We won’t be judgy.

You can also get peaches at the stand – priced slightly BELOW the u-pick price!  That’s just the way it works out pound for pound on average, when you buy a peach peck for only $22.  So nobody needs to go home without peaches, even if the u-pick orchards have been scoured by the time you arrive.

“Peaches:  Medicine, Botany, and Traditional Uses” – Special farm class on Saturday, August 24, 11 AM.  Did you know that peach leaves smell and taste delightful?  It’s not common to think about this tree beyond its juicy, fuzzy fruits, but that is exactly what this class is about.  Cali Janae, “Cal,” is a local herbalist and botanist who has traveled and lived in the Southeastern US where they grew familiar with the region’s iconic peach.  From first aid to craft cocktails, this class will flesh out the amazing plant we call a peach.  Meet at 11 AM at the Big Table near the playground.  Class attendance is free with a suggested donation of $10-20, with all proceeds going to support medicine making for herbal patients at the Ithaca Free Clinic, ithacahealth.org.

Tomatoes for u-pick and boxed at the stand.  We’re not quite in tomato boom season, though hundreds of Farmketeers have left with nice hauls of tomatoes.  There are many varieties and the abundance of each varies with the days.  You simply have to hunt around when you get here.  It’s hard to give a detailed report when that might be out of date within a day.

Eggplants for u-pick and boxed at the stand.  Several varieties of eggplant, all ready or ripening.  Hard to tell you which types you will find in abundance when you arrive.  Please enjoy exploring around.

Sweet and hot peppers for u-pick and boxed at the stand.  Many varieties, all ready or ripening.  Hard to tell you which types you will find in abundance when you arrive.  Please enjoy exploring around.

Donuts Saturday & Sunday 10:30 to 6:00.  Get your freshly fried toroids of fructotic splendor by the dozen or half-dozen.  The Mark II Donut Robot runs 10:30 (pretty sharp) to 6:00 (sharp).  Nick the Donut Kid runs a tight robot.  Good luck getting a donut at 10:29 or 6:01.  Get jugs of fresh-pressed cider by the gallon and half-gallon.  “Orchard Ambrosia,” we call it.

Love to y’all.  Hope to see you at The ‘Creek.

Posted in Crop Alerts & Farm Buzz

Why Sh*t Happens and What You Can Do About It; the Occult Power of Alabaster Platypus; Pick Your Own Apples, Tomatoes, Eggplants, Peppers, and Flowers; Sweet Fresh Cider and Weekend Donuts.

DEAR FARMKETEERS:  Three-year-old kids are the world’s top Why Machines.  “Why, Mommy?”  “Why, Papa?”  “Why why why why?”  You give your best shot at an appropriate answer each time, only to secure another “Why?” in return.  Then one day you hear a longggg string of whys.  You’re feeling a tad frayed, not as composed as usual.  You surprise little Bobby – and yourself – with this dubious classic from the good parenting manuel:  “Because sh*t happens!!”  To which the wee Bobbino simply says, “But why?”

“Alabaster Platypus.”  That’s your answer.  Works every time.  No child in the history of why has replied with a why.  Sounds like nonsense, but try this mystical utterance on your own whippersnappers.  It breaks the chain.  Stems the tide.  Magic like the number 42.  Yes, Farm Fans, “Alabaster Platypus” is a disruptive technology of surprising power, and you can use it as needed.  But there are others.

“Esmeralda Jalapeño.”  You will find Esmeralda apples and jalapeño peppers at the farm stand, plus an evolving bounty of peaches, roma tomatoes, beefsteak tomatoes, golden tomatoes, Italian eggplants, fairytale eggplants, Japanese eggplants, bell peppers, hot peppers, blueberries, cucumbers, garlic, small potatoes, cauliflower, zucchini, Pristine apples, local honey, local syrup, local pottery and… and fresh sweet cider!  Herbs and flowers you can cut right in front.

“Apostrophe Apple!”  Now picking:  William’s Pride apples (pictured) and Pristine apples.  Find them both in Row 10 of the Dwarf Orchard.  On your walk to Row 10 you can debate whether it is properly Williams’, William’s, or Williams.  The internet has not decided.  When you get to Row 10, you can pick the deliciously lemon-yellow, sweet-tart Pristines.  But, further down the row, many of you will finally pick your first apples of the year, because William’s Pride are RED APPLES which seems to be what most Farmketeers have been holding out for.  The yellow and green apples which kicked off the season were treated with precisely the contempt we have come to expect.  Sigh.  For the next 10 weeks there will be new apples to pick every week.  Yes, to answer your many, many emails… there will be Honeycrisp.

“Fuzzy Fruit, Hidden Pit.”  Now picking:  Peaches, but very thin picking this week.  You all did a wonderful job of devouring the first wave.  Thank you.  And lotssss more peaches will ripen soon, perhaps next week.  Stay tuned to the Fresh Crop Alerts.  Thanks to farm fan @dolcedelightithaca for this pic from her peach picking session.

“Nightshade, My Child, Nightshade!”  Now picking:  Tomatoes, peppers, eggplant.  We get DOZENS of emails and social media messages about which varieties are ripe on any given day and how plentiful they are.  The short answer is:  “Alabaster Platypus.”  You sorta have to come out here and hunt around.  It changes each week – each day, even.  Depends on sunshine and warm nights and how many pickers beat you to the best picking.  There are many varieties of tomatoes, some ready, some ripening.  As of TODAY, it’s mostly romas that are ready in any abundance.  There are also many varieties of sweet and hot peppers, all ready or ripening.  Same with eggplant, ready and ripening.  Look under the leaves, try new varieties, pick yourself a nightshade hodgepodge.

“Gomphrena Bouquet Cornflower Bucket.”  If your kid says “why?” to that one, you have our permission to say, “Because.”  Meantime pick your own zinnias, snapdragons, verbena, gomphrena, celosia, cornflower, statice, strawflower, scabiosa, sweetpeas, salvia, aster, dianthus, and algeratum.  Also get beautiful bouquets in mason jars, handcut and arranged by ‘Creekniks.

“I, Donut Robot.”  Get your freshly fried toroids of fructotic splendor by the dozen or half-dozen.  No rugrat will ever ask “Why?” when presented with cider donuts and an encouraging parental smile.  Except the gluten-free prodigies.  Beware:  The Mark II Donut Robot runs Saturday and Sunday 10:30 to 6:00.  Nick the Donut Kid runs a tight robot.  Good luck getting a donut at 10:29 or 6:01.

“Orchard Ambrosia.”  Nothing but 100% fresh-squeezed fruit, unpasteurized like the old days.  Get gallons and half-gallons each week, as the apple mix changes with the seasons.

“Plastic Pilates Whale.”  Goodbye forever to single-use plastic bags at the farm stand.  Whales eat 3 big meals of plastic each day — we don’t need to feed them more.  Please BYOBags or buy our reusable farm totes in 2 sizes for $1.50/2.00.  They work great for your groceries, picnics, and pilates gear.  Similarly, cardboard “peck” boxes for picking fruit and vegetables… New farm policy is they cost a buck unless you pick a full peck, then they’re free.  Just to get us all tuned in to the costs of waste.  THANK YOU so much to the best farm fans anywhere for helping us make these changes promptly and enthusiastically.

“Free Moonshine.”  You might be crossing a line saying that to your fledglings; just don’t cross any state lines.  But if you can find a sitter on a Saturday afternoon, reserve your free private hard cider tasting at Eve’s Cidery in Van Etten.  This pomological power trio – Ezra, Celia, and Autumn (and cider intern Cathryn behind the camera) – is hosting a few lucky people at a time on Saturdays at 2:00 PM.  Sign up for your slot now, because people will get the apple season buzz within a week or two and the prized tasting slots will book up.  These farmers are creative and hardworking people who make critically acclaimed ciders – and they’ve been trailblazers and trendsetters in the Finger Lakes cider scene since the beginning.  Their apples are 100% estate grown in Van Etten, south of Ithaca, many on trees from our nursery and rootstocks that Dad developed during his time at Cornell.  And yes, the private tastings are free, but umm HELLO, buy some bottles to take home.  Eve’s Cidery has an outsized, national reputation, but they’re a tiny family farm business.  You can also order online.  Thank you for supporting small farms.

Love to y’all.  Hope to see you at The ‘Creek.

Posted in Crop Alerts & Farm Buzz

How to Steal from Your Future Self and Feel Real Bad About It, Then Bounce Back by Eating Fresh Local Peaches, Tomatoes, Eggplants, Peppers, Raspberries, Apples, Donuts, and Sweet Cider.

BELOVED ‘CREEKNIKS:  What do you call it when you really want sweet peaches and tomatoes, but your farmer gives you early apples?  A CSA share!  Kidding.  CSAs can be lovely for buyers and vital for farmers.  But you’ve probably had that experience once or twice.  You dream of the season’s most prized noshings, then open your farm box to find… kohlrabi.  Hurrah!  Kohlrabi!  Sooooo much kohlrabiiii!  Well, we don’t have CSA shares at The ‘Creek, but we’re sorta pushing a deal like that on you, Dear Farmketeers, today.  Check it out.

Farmer Steve knows you want peaches and tomatoes.  Oh, he knows you want them big time – a bumper crop befitting our usual August bounty – but he really wants you to pick Pristine apples first.  Thus Pristines are the new kohlrabi.  Of course the metaphor breaks down at some point.  Pristines are nothing like kohlrabi.  Pristines are round and lemon-yellow with an alluring blush, while kohlrabi is… wait, what IS kohlrabi?  Dollars to donuts, at least 77% of our readers have no idea.  Good thing we’re pushing apples instead.

Come pick Pristine apples.  (Pleaseee.)  They are the first real apple-ish apples of the year.  Lovely lemon-yellow orbs of fruitological blushitude.  Descendants of the venerable McIntosh and Golden Delicious varieties.  Perfect for eating fresh, saucing, and cooking.  Easy to pick in Row 10 of the Dwarf Orchard.  Easy as pie.  Tart, crisp, juicy, and firm.  And isn’t that blush prettier than a store-bought doll?

Sweet apple cider is back!  More good apple news to distract you from peaches and tomatoes.  With the first apples of summer harvested, we hereby resume weekly cider pressing.  Get your “Orchard Ambrosia” in gallon and half-gallon jugs.  100% unpasteurized juice from fruit we squeeze with an R2-D2 looking contraption.  Beep beep burp burp.

But if PEACHES are what you really want, you can come pick.  Just be aware that y’all engaged in some heavy picking action on opening weekend, so you might have to hunt for ripe peaches this weekend.  Please ask at the stand which trees are ready.  Don’t go rummaging around, squeezing every peach with your big mitts and bruising the babies that aren’t ready yet.  That would be stealing from your future self – picking unripe fruit and mashing a bunch along the way.  Let us direct you to the ripe rows, and if they are are getting thin, don’t worry, be patient.  The crop is abundant and delicious this year.  The orchard might simply need a few days to recharge.  We’ll announce the big wave of ripening as soon as we see it.

Same deal with eggplant.  There are eggplant to be found; try not to pick the babies.  That would rob Future You of a nice big eggplant.  Last week’s sermon emphasized that it is best to let the babies grow so other Farmketeers can get full-size specimens.  This week, David Hasselhoff has come to remind you, “Don’t hassle the Hoff.  And don’t rob YOURSELF.”

Ditto for tomatoes.  Don’t rob Peter-You to pay Paul-You.  Come hunt for all kinds of tomatoes:  heirlooms, romas, cherries and beefsteaks.  They are all starting to ripen.  Just try to pick the ripe ones and leave the half-baked ones.  We’ll holler if a big wave comes on strong.  We’ll call for a crop mob.

Likewise for peppers.   Sweets are ready.  Hots are coming along.  Jalapeños are ready.  Serranos are ready.  Everything else can be picked but it is still green:  poblanos, Thai hots, habaneros, Hungarians, dragons toes, capperinos, Korean drying peppers, Mexican drying peppers.

Flowers.  You can go bananas on those.  There are lots.  It is easy to tell when they are ripe.  Even from like 500 feet away.  Just look.  If it’s pretty, pick it.  If not, don’t.  You can also get really cute bouquets in mason jars at the stand.  Ready to deploy as living tchotchkes on your kitchen table.  Tell your guests you picked em yourself.  Mum’s the word.

Donuts.  A limitless supply, lord willing, between 10:30 and 6:00 every Saturday and Sunday.  Lord willing because the Mark II Donut Robot can break down time to time.  After all, it’s only human.

Farm Fan spotlight.  See what @dolcedelightithaca did with her fresh-picked peaches.  Boom!

Thank you for reading this “Fresh Crop Alert” on the rarified topic of behavioral hygiene in the u-pick arena.  We leave you with two more best practices:  (1) Please bring your own bags and (2) Drive slowwww wwww wwwwwly on the farm.  Please!   Bring your own bags for picking and shopping, or buy our reusable farm totes.  There are 2 sizes, $1.50 and $2.00.  Goodbye to single-use plastic bags forever!  And be car-ful as you drive around the farm.  It is a working farm and there are machines and people and dogs and potholes and lots of other things to not crash into.

Love to y’all.  Hope to see you at The ‘Creek.

Posted in Crop Alerts & Farm Buzz

You Could Be Im-PEACHED! Come Pick the Very First Peaches, Tomatoes, Veggies, and Apples; Hooray for $1000 to Save Open Space Forever; and, Pleaseeee (Please) BYOBags!

NEW FARM RULE!  Anyone who uses the F-word or A-word before September 21 shall be punished.  That’s right, no peach-picking privileges for any person who says “fall” or “autumn” while summer is still here.  Don’t be a Donny Downer.  Don’t get im-PEACHED.

The peaches are primping.  They know the big show is coming – possibly next week.  But you can come pick peaches now.  This week is a warmup.  There are no “donut” peaches yet, and you should ask at the stand which rows are ready.  In some cases, we will be sending you to specific TREES that we know are ready to be picked.  First come, first pick.

The eggplants are singing.  Please come pick them – but ADULTS ONLY!  Don’t pick the baby eggplants.  Let them size up so everyone has a crack at picking big eggplants this season.  If earlybirds raid the patch to pick tiny eggplants, we can’t make the numbers work.  The field won’t produce as much poundage, and the farm won’t make its cabbage, as they say.  There has to be some profit built into each crop – or we should plant the field with another crop.  We love having a diverse rotation each year.  Make sense?

The tomatoes are deliberating. It’s their annual conclave to decide the big ripening date. We will report on their plans as the story unfolds. For now, you can pick cherry tomatoes.

The sweet peppers are greening and purpling.  Come pick yours now.  We will announce hot peppers later.  For now, come get sweet greens, sweet purples, and those great long skinny Italian fryers.  Not Italian Friars.  They don’t grow well in the humid climate of Upstate New York.

The raspberries are sunning.  There have been tons of pickers but also copious sunny days.  That means there are still raspberries to pick in the 3 patches – the 2 trellised fields and the fenceline along the Mutsu Orchard.  All open for picking.

The flowers are popping.  Pick your own zinnias, snapdragons, verbena, gomphrena, celosia, cornflower, statice, strawflower, scabiosa, sweetpeas, salvia, aster, dianthus, and algeratum.  Also get beautiful bouquets in mason jars.

The donuts are blooming.  When you give someone a bouquet of flowers, your love is doubled.  When you give them a bouquet of donuts, your love is trebled.  You can triple your love every Saturday and Sunday 10:30 to 6:00.

The apples are blushing.  Pristine is a real apple.  Real tart.  One of us here at the farm stand says, “They get better the more you eat them… just keep chewing.”  Got to love a gal who can put a positive spin on anything.  But Pristines are good keepers and, for some of you, the first apples of the year.  And that blush!  Come pick now.

The garlic and strawberries are goners!  You picked BOTH CROPS clean.  Thank you!  And you even had time to make art.  To wit, “American Garthlic” by @hannahkaydoyle and @amorn1chet at the 3rd Annual U-Pick Garlic Party.

And you found a new medicinal use for garlic.  Fresh stalks kissing the rhythm machine!  That’s the drummer of “Megaflora” playing during the party.  Farm Fans, your positively unim-PEACH-able performance on strawberries and garlic got the season off to our best start EVER.  Both Farmers Steve (the boss) and Greg (strawberries and garlic) were left feeling great about the season ahead, and thankful that we are able to derive a livelihood from farming here in the Finger Lakes region.  Thank you, Farmketeers.

So let’s put $1000 toward saving local farmland and open space forever.  The past few years, you have picked sprouts to raise $500 for the Finger Lakes Land Trust – the local nonprofit conservation organization that saves forests, gorges, wetlands, lakeshores, and open spaces including productive farmlands across our beautiful region.  This year is their big 30th Anniversary and we are sending them $1000 now!  You can join them on guided hikes and support this classy organization which has 22,000 acres under permanent protection.  Did you know Indian Creek Farm is protected by a permanent conservation easement?  The farm will be open space forever, and we love the work of the Finger Lakes Land Trust.  Be sure to explore their outdoor recreation web site, Go Finger Lakes, for an interactive map of the best hikes, bikes, paddles, and adventures around these parts.

Whales eat tons of plastic.  It’s a problem.  We know what you are thinking:  We should make plastic taste better.  After all, whales are foodies and they deserve a better burger, right?  But how about if we dump less plastic into the ocean and let whales eat their local krill instead?  Okay, deal.  As of this summer we have expunged single-use plastic shopping bags on the farm.  We also want to reduce consumption of cardboard picking boxes and paper cartons – which people tend to use once and not bring back on their next visit.

Please bring your own bags for picking and shopping, or buy our reusable farm totes.  There are 2 sizes, $1.50 and $2.00, and they are great for using at the farm, the grocery store, even the Pilates studio.  Who knows, maybe we’ll hold a contest for who brings the coolest containers during apple season.  Anyway, it’s time, folks.  It’s time we all knock it off with the single-use plastics.

Love to y’all.  Hope to see you at The ‘Creek.

Posted in Crop Alerts & Farm Buzz

Fight Berry Breath with Garlic! One-Day U-Pick Garlic Harvest Party Saturday; Pick Raspberries, Flowers, Eggplant, Sweet Peppers; Glean Last Strawberries Freee! Expanded Donut Hours.

DEAR FARMKETEERS, let’s hope you find this 1-page newsletter more useful than the 443-page Mueller Report, at least in the short-term.  Long-term, who can say?  But for the here and now, this little Fresh Crop Alert contains actionable intel, totally unredacted, that you may use to plan your weekend.  No mealy-mouthed dithering, no backroom horse-trading, no obstruction.  Just garlic.  And fruit.  And eggplant.  (But tons of collusion!  Just look at the peppers.  So sneaky.)

Garlic Party III.  Please join us Saturday, July 27, 10:00 to 4:00, for the 3rd Annual U-Pick Garlic Harvest Party.  This will be a casual, dress-down affair.  Wear your get-slightly-dirty clothes and bring your can-do attitude.  We need your help harvesting our best garlic crop ever.  It all needs to get pulled out of the ground Saturday.  You can catch free music and a garlic class.  Free admission.  The farm will be open for normal picking and shopping as well.  You can come pick a few heads of garlic with the kids or harvest enough to last the whole winter.  U-pick garlic prices are on the Facebook event; you can ask Garlic Greg questions about the day there on the event page.  But it’s pretty much come out and pick garlic.

You might see Garlic Greg himself in his native habitat.  He has been working the phones through the anarchist grapevine to line up live music for Saturday.  At 12:00 PM, also known as noon, Cayuga Klezmer Kapelye, featuring musicians Rima Grunes and Max Buckholtz, will wander the garlic field playing traditional and contemporary Yiddish greeting tunes.  You pick while they play!  Then at 1:30 PM, “Megaflora,” will begin.  They describe themselves as a “folk exploration of the Mesozoic era.”  So, Peter, Paul, and Mary meet Triceratops?  Folkasaurus rex?  (Back in those days, flora and fauna were still one.  Spinosaurus was as much plant as animal.  Garlic trees had teeth and wore bearskin pelts like the cave people they would evolve into.)

Medicinal Garlic Class at 11:00 AM.  Cali Janae, “Cal,” is a local herbalist and botanist with a real enthusiasm for plants and a unique spark when it comes to garlic.  (Note awesome allium tatt!)  Please join Cal at the big table by Stumphenge for a free class on garlic covering history and folklore, cultivation, and culinary and medicinal uses of this familiar plant.

Glean the last u-pick strawberries FREE on Saturday.  Garlic Greg is opening up the strawberry field to Garlic Party People.  Let’s get both fields cleaned out so we can turn our attention to the August collection – great new crops coming soon.  Look what Steuben Brewing Company did with their haul of strawberries:  “Surprise beer release today.  Strawberry Farmhouse Ale, refermented with local apple blossom honey and then aged on our lacto-fermented strawberries from @indiancreekfarmithaca…”  Cheers to fruity beers.

Raspberry picking has been fantastic – keep picking our best crop ever.  Farmketeer @zoewanders was “feeling a particular kind of summer joy that you only get from a belly full of fresh raspberries.  Thanks @indiancreekfarmithaca for the gorgeous berries!!”  Thanks for picking and nom-nomming.

Pick your own flowers.  Zinnias, snapdragons, verbena, gomphrena, celosia, cornflower, statice, strawflower, scabiosa, sweetpeas, salvia, aster, dianthus, and algeratum.  Look at these beautiful vases made by ‘Creeknik @pumapots, filled with u-pick flowers from The ‘Creek.

Pick your own eggplant.  The ripening of these first Nightshades ALMOST pushed us to jump the gun and sound the Horn of Plenty, a.k.a., the cornucopia.  But it wouldn’t be right til peaches and maybe tomatoes are on the scene.

Pick your own sweet green peppers.  If you find one in the field wearing a squash flower on its head, RUN!  Definitely not cool.  That would mean entropy is decreasing, a most unnatural state of affairs – far worse than a runaway climate.

Meanwhile, down at the farmstand, peaches.  These are Pennsylvania peaches to hold you over while our peaches cook a little longer.  But soon New York will have the climate of South Carolina and peaches will be ready in May.  So, hooray.

Also at the farmstand, apricots.  If you don’t love fresh apricots, we can’t be friends.  Okay, we can try.  But thing is, they’re objectively good.  You just have to know how to eat them.  Okay, you really just eat them.  There’s no tricks.  Try them on a picnic with your love(s).  The person(s) who make you feel safe and lucky and bold but humble.  The friend(s) who would split their last apricot with you.  Toss the pit to a squirrel.  A tithe to Gaia.  Love of all sentient beings.

Expanded donut hours.  Now every Saturday and Sunday, 10:30 to 6:00.  Nick the Donut Kid is feeling entrepreneurial.  Consider him a capitalist in training.  You are the teachers.  Thus donut eating becomes a high calling.

Love to y’all.  Hope to see you at The ‘Creek.

Posted in Crop Alerts & Farm Buzz

Lovebirds in a Heatwave! First American Farm to Harvest Giant Pink Circles for Everyone; Pick Strawberries & Raspberries; Garlic Party; Goodbye Plastic Bags – Try a New Farm Tote or BYOB.

IT’S TRUE, DEAR FARMKETEERS:  Even a broken clock is right twice a day.  Yes, as the world turns, even we dimwits and dullards can look like prodigies and professors for a brief flash… before we fumble back to normal.  The present moment feels prodigious, friends, as you will see in these 11 exhibits.

First, our digital still life, “Lovebirds in a Heatwave,” got over 2000 likes on Instagram.  That made us feel ever so slightly more clever than a typical day spent breaking farm equipment and ruining perfectly good crops, and grateful to have THE best customers in this vast stretch of fruit country between Ithaca and Trumansburg.

Second, the u-pick raspberry crop is the best ever.  You will find plentiful fruit in 3 spots around the farm, easy picking on cool mornings, and you can take your haul to the swimhole in the sweltering afternoon.  Recent text message from Autumn at Eve’s Cidery:  “It’s gonna be 100 degrees Saturday.”  So you might pick up bottles of cold, local, award-winning, 100% estate grown hooch from their tiny family farm.  You can also schedule a free private tasting at their place.  They turned a milking barn into a cute cider tastery.

Third, this is that rare moment when you can pick both raspberries AND strawberries.  Last chance for the strawbs; it has been our longest season ever.  Pick your own strawberry peck for 40% off.  By now you know that a peck is 8 quarts and a quart is $7.  Eleven out of twelve Ivy League mathematicians would agree that means a peck costs $56.  But for all Farmketeers and ‘Creekniks, and anyone who loves big pink circles, your peck will only be $34.  Thus you will save $22 simply by being less mathy.  Works out to about $4.25 a quart.  The discount kicks in at a peck, so come ready to pick.

Fifthly, big pink circles.  And a prediction:  These stickers will be our most popular crop ever.  Second only to peaches which are not ready yet so you can STOP SENDING EMAILS ASKING ABOUT PEACHES!  Kidding.  We will announce peach picking as soon as the first row is ready.  Meanwhile these generously proportioned 5″ stickers tickle the eyeballs and evoke the zeitgeist.  If Indian Creek were a cult, and Farmer Steve was the local Jim Jones, and these fetching pink disks were the Kool-Aid, well folks, it’d be time to follow The Reverend’s lead and stick a few on your bumpers.  Thus we enjoin you to express your solidarity with pink things around the world.  But we are not commie pinkos!  Sheesh, don’t be like that.  But big pink circles for everyone!  (Also available in 4″ blue circles and orange rectangles, the kind that were purple last year and you see them around town.  But it’s pink’s year.)

Sixthly, Garlic Party III.  “Garlic Greg” has set the date of Saturday, July 27, 10:00 to 4:00, for the 3rd Annual U-Pick Garlic Harvest Party.  This is high news of a low key event.  It’s not like a Pigs-n-Apples deal with 1,500 people and an epic tug of war between orchardhands and pigherders and the sheriff dang near chasing us outta town for all the cars on the highway.  This is just a day to help harvest a great garlic crop and catch some free casual activities, games, and garlicky snacks.  Free admission.  The farm will be open for normal picking and shopping as well.  You can come pick a few heads of garlic with the kids or harvest enough to last the whole winter.  U-pick garlic prices are on the Facebook event; Greg will be updating that page with more event schedule details.

Seven, pick your own flowers.  But first you have to pick a side.  Farmer Steve says pick flowers with abandon right now.  Farmer Alice says save a bunch for Farmer Tino’s wedding.  “We don’t want the field stripped before next weekend,” she explains.  Farmer Steve retorts, “A flower today is not a flower in 10 days, so pick now.”  Farmer Alice was not available for further comment at newsletter time.  This would get great ratings as a televised debate.  We would learn more about Alice and Steve than we’ll ever know about primary candidates until it’s too late.  Anyway Alice had sent a dandy list of what’s ready to pick:  zinnias, snapdragons, verbena, gomphrena, celosia, cornflower, statice, strawflower, scabiosa, sweetpeas, salvia.  Not ready yet: aster, dianthus.

Eighthly, expanded donut regime.  Now every Saturday and Sunday, 10:30 to 6:00.  That’s another 180 minutes of active donut time per weekend.  Will this increase the greater good?  Hard to say, it was just a gut-level decision.  (Donut peaches not ready yet.)

Ninthly, first apples of the year.  Please read even if you are not emotionally ready for apples.  There are about 3 of you who care about these apples each year, but Siberian people love them.  The Yellow Transparent apple is a cold-hardy variety imported in the 1800s from Putinlandia before it was officially named that.  Ripens in July for the short northern season.  To cut the acidity, people in the olden days added salt and called them salt apples.  We call them Old Yellers.  They make a CREAMY apple sauce, first chance of the year.  Good stuff to be thankful for.  We are tired of people not loving these July apples.  You Farmketeers are really starting to bore us with your Honeycrisp addiction.  Okay, fine, we’ll plant another 1,000 Honeycrisp trees in the hopes you will still like that fad of an apple in 10 years.  Meanwhile, please come pick these apples.  Pleaseeee.  Sorry.  Please.

Tenth, no more single-use plastic bags.  Done.  Kaput.  Farmer Alice of the Flowers is on a dual mission:  To save blossoms for Tino’s wedding AND rid the farm of bad plastic.  As of now we have no more single-use shopping bags.  You can bring your own bags (BYOB) or you can buy our reusable farm totes.  You’ve seen them here at the stand before, they are $1.50 each (we paid $1.36 for that batch) and they hold more apples than you could probably carry.  We also have 2 new totes coming in shortly, $1.50 and $2.00 in 2 different sizes.  Let’s all hop on this rickety train of collective personal responsibility.  Please don’t give stand workers a hard time when they tell you we don’t have free plastic bags.  “Soon it will be law,” explains Alice, “and we are horrified by the amount of plastic in the world.”  Everybody on board?

Eleventhly, Zorro got shaved for the summer.  He went from 130 pounds to 128 without the fluff.

Love to y’all.  Hope to see you at The ‘Creek.

Posted in Crop Alerts & Farm Buzz

Time to Reach for the Raspberries; We Accept Women, Infant, Children and Senior Farm Coupons; 40% Off Last Wave Strawberry Picking; and, the Shocking Truth About Where the Strawberries Go.

DEAREST FARMKETEERS:  The burden of the firstborn is not inconsiderable.  Everybody knows it’s hard to be the trailblazer… groundbreaker… trendsetter.  But do we always remember that the first in line is also the first mistake maker and first failer?  Do we afford them the space they need to blunder and grow?  Do we let them out from under the microscope?  Allow them their mysteries?

Where do the strawberries go?  First crop of the year.  They appear suddenly and then they are gone.  In July they pull up stakes and head for the ferry, trumpeting the end of spring’s labor and the dawn of lazy days.

Sweet cherries always give the strawberries a lift down to the boatdocks. They bid “fair winds and following seas” to dear old friends.

When the Pepper Fitzgerald shoves off, you hear an exuberant rendition of “Anchors Aweigh.”  No dry eyes on land or sea.

The green peppers were never known for their boatbuilding; this vessel sits a little low in the water.  But the Pepper Fitz is stalwart and seaworthy.

No one knows where the strawberries go.  Some folks have guessed the verdant highlands of Strawbistan; others surmise snowy Strawbania.

We are sad to see them leave — but the raspberries aren’t.  Before the Pepper is out of earshot, they blast “Raspberry Beret” and launch their own party barge.

It is their time to shine after a long spring of hearing, “When are the strawberries ready?”  “The strawberries are so good, Mommy!”  And a lot more besides.

Yes, the passing of Independence Day means freedom from the incidental tyranny of the “in” crowd.  Once Dad hooks his first trophy bass, everyone can giggle at ease.

The youngsters know not to swim past the buoy, but the chance to steal a first kiss draws these two teens into risky business.

It is worth knowing that raspberries are marvelous swimmers.  We try to make each Fresh Crop Alert educational, and there’s your fact of the week.

They can freedive for 22 minutes at a time.  The Sunny Goldens, in particular, have an otherwordly quality, an aquatic insouciance as they gambol undersea.

In their luminous, effortless pulsations, you can see their evolutionary cousins, the Jellyfish and Jamfish.

Meanwhile the blueberries sit on the shore.  They are a more serious lot.  Too much revelry undermines their equipoise.  A quiet dip at dusk will do.

 

AND NOW THE ACTUAL NEWS…

Donuts are still rolling.  There is just enough apple cider left to keep the cider donuts in action every Saturday and Sunday 11:00 to 5:00.  There is NOT enough cider left to sell jugs – til the first apples of 2019 are ready in a few weeks.  We’ll holler when the juice is flowing into gallon and half-gallon jugs.

Pick the final 2 rows of strawberries – still 40% off!  Strawberry season is usually over by now, but Farmer Greg planted 2 rows of late varieties and there has been enough rain – not always guaranteed – to keep the patch producing.  Pick your own peck for 40% off.  By now you know that a peck is 8 quarts and a quart is $7.  That would make a peck $56 for average people.  But for anybody named Megan Rapinoe, plus all Farmketeers and ‘Creekniks (and nobody else in the worllllllddd), your peck will only be $34.  Strawboom!  Thus you will save $22 simply by being yourself.  Have you EVER done that before?  Works out to about $4.25 a quart.  The discount kicks in at a peck, so you’ve got to come ready to pick.  Thanks to farm fan @small_graces_bnb for this photo, the next one, and the last one.  Good picking!

Pick your own raspberries.  You will find multiple raspberry patches on the farm.  Well you might not FIND them, but they are here.  One in the “Central Plains” and one out past the Mutsu Orchard and one along the fenceline.  Try the map in our new 2019 brochure.  It’s a great map that works like the 80-20 Rule, but tweaked to 20-60-20 and applied to small fruit farms.  Thus:  20% of customers need it bad but won’t use it, 20% know the farm inside out and don’t need it, and 59% swing with the prevailing winds.  That leaves 1%.  They own the Grand Cayman shell corp that owns the bank that owns the farm.  “Maps are for suckers,” you’d hear them chortle, snickering over stogies at the Risk board.  (“Kamchatka is mine!” barks one at the stroke of midnight.  Bing bonggg.)

You can use your Farmers Market Nutrition Program (FMNP) coupons here.  We are set up to accept checks through the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and the similar program for seniors.  The federal program, administered through state agencies, was created to provide fresh, unprepared, locally grown fruits and vegetables to participants and to expand the awareness of farmers’ markets.  We are also working on getting approved to accept SNAP electronic benefits.  Stay tuned.

Love to y’all.  Hope to see you at The ‘Creek.

Posted in Crop Alerts & Farm Buzz